Home News Tuesday Afternoon News, March 24th

Tuesday Afternoon News, March 24th

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Iowa Department Of Public Health Now Reports 119 Cases Of COVID-19

(Des Moines) — The Iowa Department of Public Health has announced as of Tuesday morning, an additional 19 confirmed cases of COVID-19 have been reported in Iowa. That brings the total to 124 positive cases. The Iowa Department of Public Health says there have been a total of 2.315 negative
tests to date, which includes testing reported by the State Hygienic Lab and other labs. The counties reporting the new cases of coronavirus includes those that had already had positive coronavirus cases. They include: Black Hawk, Buchanan, Cedar, Dallas, Jasper, Johnson, Muscatine, Polk, Poweshiek, Story, Tama, Warren, and Washington Counties. Governor Kim Reynolds will hold another coronavirus update briefing at 2:30 p.m. this afternoon.

 

 

Grassley Upset With Democratic Senators For Blocking COVID-19 Relief Bill

(Washington) — The U-S Senate failed to pass the COVID-19 relief bill as proposed. The vote was conducted late Monday afternoon, and was actually a tie with 47 senators voting in favor of the bill and 47 senators voting against the measure, with the vote split down party lines. The bill was the “phase 3” which would order $1.8 trillion to the American people. Roughly
$300 billion in direct cash checks to American households, $350 billion in loans to small businesses to cover interruption in business, and $500 billion in other relief to businesses, largely through loan guarantees. Iowa Republican Senator Chuck Grassley is upset and baffled as to why the Democrats voted against the bill. Grassley made his comments with Fox
Business News Anchor Neil Cavato.

Democrats believe more funding needs to go to individual family members.
They claim the bill would only have helped corporations. Grassley fiercely denies that charge.

Grassley says in most cases corporations will be given a loan, not a flat-out bail-out check. He questions his Democratic Senate colleagues as to why they have that belief when Grassley says the facts speak differently.

Across the United States, the spread of COVID-19 has grown ten-fold in a week’s time, and many people wonder why our nation’s leaders in Washington D.C. are dragging their feet on a measure that shouldn’t be political. Many people are calling it “dilly-dallying.”

It is unknown at this time as to when, or if, the Senate will vote again on the COVID-19 Relief bill. However, New York Democratic Senator and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer says he is confident a compromise will be able to be reached.

 

 

Woman Sentenced 50 Years For Death Of Son

DAVENPORT, Iowa (AP) – A woman from Chicago has been sentenced to 50 years in prison on charges stemming from the beating death of her 5-year-old son in Iowa. Jacqueline Rambert was sentenced Friday in Davenport. She’d pleaded guilty to two child endangerment charges. Her co-defendant, Tre Henderson, was convicted of murder and is scheduled to be sentenced April 1 to life in prison. Prosecutors say Ja’Shawn Bussell had 17 broken ribs and bruises from the top of his head to his ankles after Henderson beat him in April 2018. Henderson and Rambert are from Chicago and were living in a Davenport apartment when the boy was beaten.

 

 

Iowans Responding To Census 2020 Survey

(Washington) — The U-S Census Bureau says Iowa is one of the very best states so far in terms of its response rate to this year’s big count.
Iowa’s response rate ranks number-two in the country, just a fraction behind Wisconsin and just ahead of Minnesota. The bureau says about 26-percent of Iowans have filled out their census forms, either online, by mail or phone, with 23-percent of Iowans responding online. The national average is 21-percent, five points behind Iowa. The states at the bottom of the list are Montana, West Virginia and Alaska, where only 11-percent have responded. The mailers started going out March 12th. Beginning in May, census takers will start knocking on doors of homes from which there’s been no response.
https://2020census.gov/en/response-rates.html