Friday, November 28, 2014
   
Text Size
Banner

LBIC Issues Economic Development Report

(Le Mars) -- Plymouth County and the city of Le Mars is in a good position to add to the current labor force, according to an economic development report issued by Neil Adler, executive director of the Le Mars Business Inititative Corporation, or LBIC.   Adler submitted a report to both the Plymouth County Board of Supervisors and the Le Mars City Council last week. He says twice as many people commute to Le Mars to work as there are that travel away from Le Mars for work.

 Listen here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


Adler says Le Mars ranks well when compared to other communities across the state.

Listen here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


Adler says although more workers are coming to Le Mars for employment, the data shows that those workers are aging.

 Listen here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


The LBIC executive says when you look at the six county region compensation, it does show that worker's wages are lower at about $35,000 compared to the state's average of $42,000.  However, he says Plymouth county ranks high with the average employee compensation. Adler also notes that cost of living expenses are generally lower in northwest Iowa.

Listen here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 

Census Survey Shows Iowans Have a Short Commute

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) - U.S. Census Bureau data show Iowa's average commute is nearly 6 minutes shorter than the national average.
     The Des Moines Register reports (http://dmreg.co/JbfYMY ) that the average Iowa commute is 19.1 minutes. That ties the state with Kansas for the seventh-fastest average commute in the country. The national average is 25 minutes.
     The Census Bureau's American Community Survey says North Dakota residents enjoy the nation's shortest average commute: 16.1 minutes.
     The Iowa Transportation Department says Iowan residents travel an average of 11.5 miles to work.
     The census data say Madison County residents have the longest average commute: 29 minutes. Many of them work in the Des Moines area.
     The state's shortest average commute is the 12.3 minutes in Sioux County.
     ---

 

STEM Hubs Selected

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) - Gov. Terry Branstad says six Iowa universities and colleges will be home to centers that will promote teaching science, technology, engineering and math to students no
matter where they live.
     Branstad says lack of equal opportunity for such programs to all students is hurting the state's ability to retain and attract businesses needing highly skilled workers.
     He says test scores show Iowa students have fallen behind in math and science education.
     The centers called STEM hubs will be located at Iowa Lakes Community College in Estherville, University of Northern Iowa, Iowa State University, Southwestern Community College in Creston, and
Drake University. The University of Iowa and Kirkwood Community College work together to form the sixth.
     Funding for the offices is included in an education budget bill pending in the Legislature.

 

Flight School Turns in Student

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) - An Iowa flight school tipped off federal regulators that a man hoping to become a commercial pilot falsely inflated his experience to get a license.
     Fahad Nabeel Hussein Al-Daous pleaded guilty Friday to one count of lying to the Federal Aviation Administration.
     He admitted he falsely listed on an application for an instrument-rated license that he had 50 hours of cross-country flight experience that is required. After he passed a ride with an
FAA pilot examiner in Ottumwa, he received the license in May 2011.
     Hussein Al-Daous claimed he'd conducted his flights through Waterloo-based Livingston Aviation. Months later, that company told the FAA that billing records showed he hadn't taken many flights he
claimed.
     Hussein Al-Daous told investigators he planned to use inflated data to get a commercial pilot license.

    


 

 

Search KLEM

Banner

Banner

Stock Market

1 DOW 17,827.75
+12.81 (0.07%)    
2 S&P 2,072.83
+5.80 (0.28%)    
3 NASDAQ 4,787.32
+29.06 (0.61%)    

Copyright 2010, Powell Broadcasting, Website developed by iCast Interactive