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Agri-Line - Le Mars Agricultural Connection

Cool Temps Slow Down Crop Maturity

(Le Mars) -- With the cooler temperatures that we have been experiencing, many farmers are wondering if that may mean an early frost is likely this year.  If frost were to come early, would our crops have reached maturity so yields won't be compromised?  Joel DeJong, Iowa State University Extension Crops Specialist for northwest Iowa details how much more time the corn crop needs in order to become fully mature.

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DeJong says if temperatures remain cooler than normal for a significant time period, that could further slow down the maturity development process. He says the closer to the maturity date before frost hits, the less likelihood for yield loss.

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The crops specialist says the corn crop is falling behind on growing degree days.

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USDA Crop Report Looks To Set Record

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) - Farmers will produce a record-breaking corn harvest this year, surpassing earlier expectations of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which has revised upward its estimate of this year's corn harvest to 14 billion bushels.
     That exceeds last year's 13.9 billion bushel record.
     Soybean production also will set a new record at 3.8 billion bushels, beating the 2009 harvest of 3.4 billion bushels.
     Farmers are blessed with an abundant crop but cursed that it has driven prices lower. They are taking more control of their grain marketing by building more on-farm storage, holding onto the crop and timing the sale to maximize profit.
     Rain fell at the right times and a cooler summer made for favorable growing conditions in the 18 states that produce 91 percent of the nation's corn.

 


 

 

   

Farmers Cut Back On Corn Acreage, But Plant More Soybeans

 DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) - American farmers have planted less corn than in any year since 2010 but more soybeans than ever, as expected.
     The U.S. Department of Agriculture says in its annual Acreage Report released Monday that farmers planted 91.6 million acres of corn. That's 4 percent less than last year but still the fifth-largest corn crop planted since 1944. Analysts expected some farmers to devote more acreage to soybeans because of a drop in corn prices.
     The USDA says farmers planted a record high 84.8 million acres of soybeans, up 11 percent from last year. Record soybean acres have been planted in Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota and Wisconsin.
     Seventy-six percent of the corn crop is in good to excellent condition, compared with 63 percent last year.
 

   

Farmers Concerned About Cold Temps On Planted Seed

Farmers Concerned About Cold Temperatures With Planted Seed

(Le Mars) -- Farmers have been thankful for the rains of the last few days, but along with the rains have been some colder than normal temperatures, and farmers who have planted corn are wondering if the seed can withstand the colder soil temps.  Iowa State University Extension crops specialist Joel DeJong believes most of the planted corn will survive.

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As for the reserve soil moisture levels, DeJong says northwest Iowa could use additional rains.

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The ISU crops specialist believes all of the frost has finally thawed within this area.

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