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Virus Information

 

Iowa Cases
as of 5.29.2020
Plymouth 120
Sioux 213
Woodbury 2681
Cherokee 24

https://coronavirus.iowa.gov/

South Dakota cases
as of 5.20.2020
Minnehaha 3317
Lincoln 237
Union 88

https://doh.sd.gov/news/Coronavirus.aspx

Nebraska cases
as of 5.20.2020
Dixon 26
Dakota 2864
Thurston 38

 

https://nebraska.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/4213f719a45647bc873ffb58783ffef3

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Iowa Cases as of 5.25.2020   Plymouth117Sioux207Woodbury2636Cherokee18

South Dakota cases as of 5.20.2020   Minnehaha3274Lincoln230Union79

Nebraska cases
as of 5.20.2020
Dixon 25
Dakota 1612
Thurston 30

 

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Plymouth89Sioux158Woodbury2364Cherokee9

South Dakota cases as of 5.20.2020   Minnehaha3182Lincoln209Union68

Nebraska cases as of 5.20.2020   Dixon27Dakota1476Thurston19

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Iowa Cases as of 5.19.2020   Plymouth89Sioux150Woodbury2343Cherokee9

South Dakota cases as of 5.19.2020   Minnehaha3165Lincoln205Union62

Nebraska cases as of 5.19.2020   Dixon27Dakota1476Thurston19

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Iowa Cases as of 5.17.2020

Plymouth 86

Sioux 131

Woodbury 2278

Cherokee 9

South Dakota cases as of 5.18.2020

Minnehaha 3150

Lincoln

Union 62

Nebraska cases as of 5.18.2020

Dixon 27

Dakota

Thurston 19

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Iowa Current cases as of 5.13.2020

Plymouth       – 74
Sioux             – 111
Woodbury       – 2,073  –
Cherokee        – 6

South Dakota as of 5.14.2020

Minnehaha     – 3,050   –
Lincoln           – 195
Union             – 57

Nebraska as of 5.14.2020

Dixon           – 25
Dakota         – 1,412
Thurston      – 19

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Iowa Current cases as of 5.11.2020

Plymouth       – 67
Sioux             – 100
Woodbury       – 1,988  –
Cherokee        – 6

South Dakota as of 5.12.2020

Minnehaha     – 2,978   –
Lincoln           – 190
Union             – 56

Nebraska as of 5.12.2020

Dixon           – 24
Dakota         – 1,378
Thurston      – 14

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Iowa Current cases as of 5.10.2020

Plymouth       – 62
Sioux             – 93
Woodbury       – 1,676  –
Cherokee        – 6

South Dakota as of 5.11.2020

Minnehaha     – 2,952   –
Lincoln           – 191
Union             – 53

Nebraska as of 5.11.2020

Dixon           – 24
Dakota         – 1,348
Thurston      – 13

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Iowa Current cases as of 5.7.2020

Plymouth       – 48
Sioux             – 37
Woodbury       – 1,532  –
Cherokee        – 4

South Dakota as of 5.8.2020

Minnehaha     – 2,535   – 26 deaths
Lincoln           – 180
Union             – 50

Nebraska as of 5.8.2020

Dixon           – 15
Dakota         – 1,017
Thurston      – 9

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Iowa Current cases as of 5.6.2020

Plymouth       – 44
Sioux             – 31
Woodbury       – 1,429  –
Cherokee        – 4

South Dakota as of 5.7.2020

Minnehaha     – 2,332   – 26 deaths
Lincoln           -171
Union             -48

Nebraska as of 5.7.2020

Dixon           – 14
Dakota         – 969
Thurston      – 7

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Iowa Current cases as of 5.5.2020

Plymouth       – 34
Sioux             – 25
Woodbury       – 1,323  – 4 deaths
Cherokee        – 4

South Dakota as of 5.6.2020

Minnehaha     – 2,231   – 24 deaths
Lincoln           -170
Union             -46

Nebraska as of 5.6.2020

Dixon           – 14
Dakota         – 1,118
Thurston      – 7

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Iowa Current cases as of 5.4.2020

Plymouth       – 33
Sioux             – 24
Woodbury       – 1,296  – 3 deaths
Cherokee        – 4

South Dakota as of 5.5.2020

Minnehaha     – 2,195   – 19 deaths
Lincoln           -164
Union             -46

Nebraska as of 5.5.2020

Dixon           – 14
Dakota         – 1,104
Thurston      – 6

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Iowa Current cases as of 5.3.2020

Plymouth       – 27
Sioux             – 23
Woodbury       – 1,152  – 2 deaths
Cherokee        – 4

South Dakota as of 5.4.2020

Minnehaha     – 2,170   – 16 deaths
Lincoln           -163
Union             -32

Nebraska as of 5.4.2020

Dixon           – 13
Dakota         – 937
Thurston      – 7

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Iowa Current cases as of 5.2.2020

Plymouth         – 23
Sioux               – 17
Woodbury         – 1,112  -2 deaths
Cherokee           – 4

South Dakota as of 5.3.2020

Minnehaha         – 2,142 -16 deaths
Lincoln               – 162
Union                 – 31

Nebraska as of 5.3.2020

Dixon                 – 13
Dakota               – 918
Thurston             – 6

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Current cases as of 5.1.2020

Plymouth – 17
Sioux       – 11
Woodbury – 1,074  – 2 deaths
Cherokee   – 3

https://coronavirus.iowa.gov/

South Dakota as of 5.1.2020

Minnehaha – 2,123 -16 deaths
Lincoln       – 156
Union         – 27

https://doh.sd.gov/news/Coronavirus.aspx

Nebraska

https://nebraska.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/4213f719a45647bc873ffb58783ffef3

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May 7, 2020

Part 1

(Le Mars) — People have had to deal with the COVID-19 coronavirus since mid-March, with several interruptions to our daily lives. Businesses, church services, organizations, events, meetings and seminars, and schools have all had to be closed or cancelled because of the virus. The number of positive cases of COVID-19 continues to climb, including Plymouth County. Tara
Geddes, Community Health Director for Plymouth County says as of Wednesday, May 6th, Plymouth County has reported 34 positive cases.

Some people have wondered if Governor Reynolds was a bit too quick in lifting many of the restrictions for 77 Iowa counties, including Plymouth County.
Geddes says since the governor’s order allowing for businesses to again be open, Plymouth County has witnessed a significant increase for the number of positive cases.

The community health official says Plymouth County probably has not yet seen our number of positive coronavirus numbers reach their peak.

Geddes says health officials are learning more about the virus each and every day. She says the symptoms associated with the COVID-19 virus have now expanded.

Part 2

Yesterday, (Wednesday) we learned that Plymouth County had 34 positive cases of the coronavirus. That number has now grown to 44 positive cases in Plymouth County as of Thursday, May 7th. More than 600 positive cases were reported in Iowa on Thursday by the Iowa Department of Public Health, with the number of individuals testing positive for COVID-19 now listed at 11,059. Nearly
66,500 people have tested negative for the virus. 4,266 people have made full recoveries from the virus, and unfortunately, the death toll from COVID-19 virus continues to rise, with the latest statistics from the Iowa Department of Public Health now reporting there have been 231 deaths across the state.

This time of year, due to high pollen counts, many people suffer the effects from allergies. It is also a time when spring colds may be common. But with the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus, some people may be confused as to whether they simply have the symptoms of a cold or allergies, or if they are having the symptoms associated with the virus. Tara Geddes is the Community Health Director for Plymouth County and says it is understandable why people may feel confused and frighten.

Several meat processing facilities across the state, and within the region, have needed to shut down because of a high rate of infestation with workers contracting the COVID-19 virus. Geddes says her office has been in contact with several local food-based industries that have hundreds of employees to prevent any type of wide spread outbreak of the coronavirus, as seen at several major meat processing plants.

Since the virus spreads quickly, many people wonder if there is anything that can actually kill the virus.

(photo contributed.)

The Center for Disease Control and other public health officials suggest wearing a mask to help prevent the spread of the virus. Geddes explains why wearing a mask is so important.

The community health director reminds people that are most susceptible to contracting the virus to limit your travels to essential trips, and to stay at home as much as possible.

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update May 2, 2020

DES MOINES, Iowa — The Iowa Department of Public Health Saturday identified 757 new cases of COVID-19 across Iowa, bringing the state’s total to 8,641 since the start of the pandemic, Nearly 500 of the cases reported Saturday came from four counties. Black Hawk, Dallas, Polk and Woodbury Counties are seeing a significant rise in cases, largely due to the spread of the virus in large factories.

87% of the new cases Saturday are in the 22 counties where restrictions remain in place. Governor Reynolds lifted many restrictions in 77 Iowa Counties she deemed to have low activity of coronavirus.

Five additional deaths were also reported, bringing the death toll in Iowa to 175. Outbreaks of COVID-19 are now reported in 26 long-term care centers in Iowa. 26 new patients were admitted to ICU units in the state, bringing the hospitalization count right now to 353. 90 of those patients are currently on ventilators.

According to IDPH the additional 5 deaths were reported in the following counties:

Linn County, 2 older adults (61-80 years)
Polk County , 1 older adult (61-80 years)
Tama County, 1 older adult (61-80 years)
Woodbury County, 1 older adult (61-80 years)

 

Iowa counties featured in the grey color will be allowed to open for business after May 1st, while the counties colored in orange must remain closed and follow the mitigation efforts at least until May 15th.

(Des Moines) — Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds lifted some of the restrictions for businesses to open in 77 of Iowa’s 99 counties. However, she says there are still some parameters and guidelines that businesses will need to follow. The governor says she is lifting some of the mitigation efforts in counties where there are few to no cases, or where cases have been managed, and leveling.

The governor listed those businesses that can open, should they choose to do so.

Reynolds says the businesses allow to conduct commerce, must still abide by some standards. She also advises those Iowans with pre-existing health conditions, along with the elderly to remain in their homes.

Most of all northwest Iowa counties, including Plymouth County, are allowed to begin opening for business. However, Woodbury County is among the 22 counties that will still need to abide by the strict mitigation orders, until at least May 15th. The remaining 21 counties are situated in eastern and central Iowa.

 

There has been some confusion following Governor Reynolds directive to have some businesses open while others remain closed due to the COVID-19 outbreak.  Following is the exact wording from the governor’s proclamation:

REOPENING OF BUSINESSES AND ESTABLISHMENTS

(All counties except Allamakee, Benton, Black Hawk, Bremer, Dallas, Des Moines, Dubuque, Fayette, Henry, Iowa, Jasper, Johnson, Linn, Louisa, Marshall, Muscatine, Polk, Poweshiek, Scott, Tama, Washington, or Woodbury County)

SECTION TWO.  Pursuant to Iowa Code § 135.144 (3), and in conjunction with the Iowa Department of Public Health, unless otherwise modified by subsequent proclamation or order of the Iowa Department of Public Health, I hereby order that effective at 5:00 a.m. on May 1, 2020 and until 11:59 p.m. on May 15, 2020:

A.   Restaurants: A restaurant may reopen to serve food and beverages on its premises, but only to the extent that it complies with the following requirements:

(1)  Capacity limited: The restaurant must limit the number of customers present at indoor or outdoor spaces to 50% of its normal operating capacity to ensure adequate spacing of groups.

(2)  Groups limited: The restaurant must ensure that no group of customers seated together in the restaurant is larger than six people.

(3)  Social distancing: The restaurant must ensure at least six feet of physical distance between each group or individual dining alone.

(4)  Self-service prohibited:  The restaurant must not have any self-service of food or beverages, including buffets or salad bars.

(5)  Social distancing, hygiene, and public health measures: The restaurant shall also implement reasonable measures under the circumstances of each restaurant to ensure social distancing of employees and customers, increased hygiene practices, and other public health measures to reduce the risk of transmission of COVID-19 consistent with guidance issued by the Iowa Department of Inspections and Appeals and the Iowa Department of Public Health.

This paragraph does not reopen a bar, which must remain closed to the public except as provided in section 2, paragraph A of this Proclamation.

B. Fitness centers: A fitness center, health club, health spa, or gym may reopen, but only to the extent that it complies with the following requirements:

(1)  Capacity limited: The establishment must limit the number of customers present to 50% of its maximum legal occupancy capacity.

(2)  Social distancing: The establishment must ensure that all equipment, such as treadmills, bikes, weight machines, benches, and power racks, are spaced at least six feet apart or take other appropriate measures to ensure that more closely spaced equipment is not used.

(3)  Group activities: Any group activities or classes must be limited to ten or fewer people and all people participating must maintain a distance of six feet apart at all times.

(4)  Social distancing, hygiene, and public health measures: The establishment shall also implement reasonable measures under the circumstances of each establishment to ensure social distancing of employees and customers, increased hygiene practices, and other public health measures to reduce the risk of transmission of COVID-19 consistent with guidance issued by the Iowa Department of Public Health.

C.   Malls: An enclosed mall may reopen, but only to the extent that it complies with the following requirements:

(1)  Capacity limited: The mall must limit the number of customers present to 50% of its maximum legal occupancy capacity.

(2)  Common seating areas: All common seating areas, such as food courts, shall remain closed. Restaurants in food courts may operate on a carry-out basis.

(3)  Play areas: Any play area or playground must remain closed.

(4)  Social distancing, hygiene, and public health measures: The mall shall also implement reasonable measures under the circumstances of each mall to ensure social distancing of employees and customers, increased hygiene practices, and other public health measures to reduce the risk of transmission of COVID-19 consistent with guidance issued by the Iowa Department of Public Health.

D.   Libraries: A library may reopen provided that it limits the number of patrons present to 50% of its maximum legal occupancy capacity and implements reasonable measures under the circumstances of each library to ensure social distancing of employees and patrons, increased hygiene practices, and other public health measures to reduce the risk of transmission of COVID-19 consistent with guidance issued by the Iowa Department of Public Health.

E. Race tracks: A speedway or race track, other than a track conducting horse or dog races, may reopen its operations provided that it does not permit any spectators to attend its events in person.

F. Other retail establishments: A retail establishments that was previously ordered to be closed statewide, and is now ordered to be closed only in certain counties under section 5, paragraph I, may reopen, but only to the extent that it limits the number of customers present to 50% of its maximum legal occupancy capacity and implements reasonable measures under the circumstances of each establishment to ensure social distancing of employees and customers, increased hygiene practices, and other public health measures to reduce the risk of transmission of COVID-19 consistent with guidance issued by the Iowa Department of Public Health.

This section shall apply only to businesses and establishments located in an Iowa county other than Allamakee, Benton, Black Hawk, Bremer, Dallas, Des Moines, Dubuque, Fayette, Henry, Iowa, Jasper, Johnson, Linn, Louisa, Marshall, Muscatine, Polk, Poweshiek, Scott, Tama, Washington, or Woodbury counties.

EXTENSION OF CLOSURES AND ORDERS

(Statewide)

SECTION THREE.  Pursuant to Iowa Code § 135.144 (3), and in conjunction with the Iowa Department of Public Health, unless otherwise modified by subsequent proclamation or order of the Iowa Department of Public Health, I hereby extend the following orders until 11:59 p.m. on May 15, 2020:

A.   Bars: A bar shall continue to be closed to the general public except that to the extent permitted by applicable law as modified by the suspensions in this Proclamation, and in accordance with any recommendations of the Iowa Department of Public Health, food and beverages may be sold if such food or beverages are promptly taken from the premises, such as on a carry-out or drive-through basis, or if the food or beverage is delivered to customers off the premises. For the purposes of this section, a bar is an establishment where a customer may purchase alcoholic beverages and in which the serving of food in incidental to the consumption of those beverages and is limited to the service of ice, snack foods and the reheating of commercially prepared foods such as frozen pizza, pre-packaged sandwiches, or other prepackaged, ready-to-serve products.

B. Theaters: All theaters or other performance venues at which live performances or motion pictures are shown shall continue to be closed.

C.   Casinos and gaming facilities: All casinos and other facilities conducting pari-mutuel wagering or gaming operations shall continue to be closed.

D.   Social and fraternal clubs:  All social and fraternal clubs, including but not limited to American Legion or VFW posts, Elks Clubs, country clubs, and golf course clubhouses shall be closed, except that food and beverages may be sold if such food or beverages are promptly taken from the premises and a golf course clubhouse may also be open to the minimal extent necessary to facilitate use of the golf course provided appropriate social distancing practices are implemented.

E. Senior citizen centers and adult daycare facilities:  All facilities that conduct adult day services or other senior citizen centers shall continue to be closed.

F. Amusements: All bingo halls, bowling alleys, pool halls, arcades, and amusement parks shall continue to be closed.

G.   Museums, aquariums, and zoos: All museums, aquariums, and zoos shall continue to be closed.

H.   Skating rinks and skate parks: All indoor or outdoor roller or ice skating rinks and skate parks shall continue to be closed.

I. Playgrounds: All outdoor or indoor playgrounds or children’s play centers shall continue to be closed. This order does not apply to playgrounds in private residences or childcare facilities.

J. Campgrounds: All public and private campgrounds shall continue to be closed to temporary recreational use. This order shall not prohibit the use of a campground by a long-term or permanent tenant who resides at the campground. All cabins and yurts in state parks shall also continue to be closed to temporary residents.

K.   Swimming pools: All swimming pools and spas, wading pools, water slides, wave pools, spray pads, and bath houses, as defined in Iowa Code § 135I.1, shall continue to be closed.

L. Salons: All salons, including all establishments providing the services of cosmetology, electrology, esthetics, nail technology, manicuring, and pedicuring, all as defined in Iowa Code § 157.1, shall continue to be closed.

M.  Barbershops: All Barbershops, as defined Iowa Code § 158.1, shall continue to be closed.

N.   Medical spas: All medical spas, as defined in Iowa Admin Code § 653-13.8(1), shall continue to be closed.

O.   Tattoo establishments: All Tattoo establishments, as regulated by Iowa Code § 135.37, shall continue to be closed.

P. Tanning facilities: All tanning facilities, as defined by Iowa Code § 136D.2(5) shall continue to be closed.

Q.   Massage therapy establishments: All establishments where an individual is practicing massage therapy as defined by Iowa Code § 152C.1(3) shall continue to be closed.

R.   Door-to-door sales:  All unsolicited door-to-door sales and solicitations at all homes and residences shall continue to be prohibited.

SECTION FOUR.  I continue to direct all state agencies to coordinate expeditiously in developing and implementing plans to mitigate the economic effects of the closings necessitated by this disaster, including potential financial support, regulatory relief, and other executive actions.

Plymouth County Confirms Fifth COVID-19 Case

(Le Mars) A fifth case of novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has been confirmed in Plymouth County. According to the Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH), the individual is in self-isolation in their home.  This individual is a female in the age range of 61-80.

As of April 14, there have been 1,899 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Iowa, according to the Iowa Department of Public Health.  In total, health officials have tested 19,366 people in Iowa.  There have been 790 Iowans that have recovered.  There have been 49 deaths related to COVID-19.

This will be the final case reported to the media from Floyd Valley Community Health.  For future up-to-date information on COVID-19, visit the IDPH webpage at https://coronavirus.iowa.gov/https://idph.iowa.gov/Emerging-Health-Issues/Novel-Coronavirus or follow the department on Facebook at @IowaDepartmentOfPublicHealth and on Twitter at @IAPublicHealth.  You may also call the IDPH Hotline 24/7 at 211.

 

Reynolds Asking Additional Businesses To Close – Law Enforcement To Step Up Enforcing Coronavirus Rules

(Le Mars) — Plymouth County Health officials are reporting a fourth positive case of COVID-19 coronavirus. The reported case involves a male adult between 18 and 40 years of age. During today’s daily briefing, Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds reported the latest numbers involving COVID-19 cases in Iowa.

Reynolds says she expects this week to be another difficult week as the numbers are anticipating of rising again.  Governor Reynolds is asking businesses to extend the time of being closed until at least April 30th. Reynolds also expanded the businesses that should close.

Reynolds has asked local law enforcement agencies to begin stepping up and enforcing rules about social gatherings. Public Safety Commissioner Stephan Bayens addressed the responsibilities of law enforcement during the time of
coronavirus.

Commissioner Bayans continues to explain the role law enforcement agencies as they protect the safety of Iowans.

Bayans asked Iowans to do what is right by staying at home.

 

(Le Mars) — Plymouth County now has its first confirmed case of COVID-19 coronavirus. A case of novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has been confirmed in Plymouth County. According to the Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH), the individual is in self-isolation in their home. This individual is a male in the age range of 18-40.

Tara Geddes, Floyd Valley Community Health Manager, says “While this is Plymouth County’s first case, we know it probably will not be the last. We encourage all residents to continue to make prevention a priority and continue to follow the directives sent out of the Governor’s Office.”

Prevention includes:

· Washing hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds each time.

· Covering coughs and sneezes with a tissue or elbow/upper arm.

· Staying home when ill.

As of April 2, there have been 614 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Iowa, according to the Iowa Department of Public Health. There are currently 74 people hospitalized due to the virus, while 46 others have been discharged and are now recovering. There were 347 positive cases that did not require hospitalization. There have been 11 deaths related to COVID-19.

In total, health officials have tested 8,054 negative cases in Iowa.

Approximately 80% of Iowans infected with COVID-19, will experience only a mild to moderate illness. Most mildly ill Iowans do not need to go to their healthcare provider or be tested to confirm they have COVID-19. Sick Iowans must stay home and isolate themselves from others in their house.

Stay home and isolate from others in the house until:

· You have had no fever for at least 72 hours (that is three full days of no fever without the use of medicine that reduces fevers)
AND

· other symptoms have improved (for example, when your cough or shortness of breath have improved)
AND

· at least 7 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared.

If you think you may need healthcare, call your provider before you go to the office. You may be given special instructions.

For up-to-date information on COVID-19, visit the IDPH webpage at https://idph.iowa.gov/Emerging-Health-Iss…/Novel-Coronavirus

Here is information on how to protect yourself from the Centers for Disease Control:

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html

 

A 17-year-old kid near Seattle named Avi Schiffmann started a website in late December that tracks coronavirus cases around the world in real time.  You can check it out at nCoV2019.live.  He intentionally included how many patients have recovered in each country, so people won’t just focus on the negative.

 

(Le Mars) — A physician at Floyd Valley Healthcare wants to make certain people know the facts as they relate to the spread of the COVID-19, coronavirus. Dr. Steven Meis has been a medical physician in Le Mars for 27 years. Meis says we don’t need to panic, but we do need to be aware, concerned, and cautious of the wide spread virus.

Meis says the other consideration we all need to remember is the coronavirus can mutate and multiply fairly quickly.

Meis says the medical industry is hoping to slow down the rate of exposure and positive cases in Iowa, by having schools, offices, businesses, and other entities being shut down.

The Floyd Valley physician says he hopes the rate of contamination can be maintained at a fairly level pace.

KLEM will feature additional comments from Dr. Meis as he discusses the facts about coronavirus.

 

 

Kass Addresses COVID-19 Issue – Courthouse To Remain Open

(Le Mars) — The spread of the COVID-19, coronavirus, is causing several closures of offices and businesses, and other entities. On Tuesday, Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds declared a Public Health Disaster Emergency which essentially means that there can be no more than ten people gathered in one
location. In addition, the order means that restaurants and bars must close their doors, unless they distribute food through a drive-through or carry-out. Also closed are fitness centers, theaters, and casinos. Reynolds on Tuesday prohibited mass gatherings and events including parades, festivals, conventions, and fundraisers. Le Mars city administrator, Jason Vacura has
ordered all city facilities to be closed to the public for a duration of 14 days until the end of the month of March. Plymouth County courthouse, as of now, remains open. However, County Supervisor chairman Don Kass says conditions are changing by the hour, and he encourages people to use on-line and postal services.

Being a livestock producer, Kass says he understands how quickly a virus can spread. He says Plymouth County, as of today’s date, hasn’t had any reported cases of the coronavirus, but Kass fears it may be only a matter of time before the first positive case is reported.

Kass says many people may believe health and state government officials are going over-board and exaggerating with their precautions of shutting down schools, and businesses. However, Kass says people simply need to do the math to see what potential dangers may be coming.

The Plymouth County supervisor says the county board has been working closely with county health officials. He asks people to remain calm, and to realize that many people have recovered after contracting the virus.

Kass says there are thousands of people who because of an existing health issue, may be more vulnerable to the contracting of the coronavirus.

The Iowa Department of Public Health says 29 residents have now tested positive for coronavirus.

 

 

Floyd Valley Adopts New Policies For COVID-19

(Le Mars) — Due to the spread of the COVID-19, coronavirus, Floyd Valley Healthcare has implemented some new policies and procedures. So far, there have not been any outbreak cases of the coronavirus in Plymouth County. Ann Cole-Nelson serves as the hospital’s Community Relations Director says the
safety of the patients and staff are the top priority. She says the
landscape of the virus is ever changing, so she suggests people frequently check the hospital’s standards.

Cole-Nelson says the hospital has also placed some restrictions with its cafeteria.

The Floyd Valley Community Relations Director says nurses will be staffed at the entrances to help monitor the situation.

Cole-Nelson says hospital officials have been meeting on a frequent basis to stay up to date on the latest information regarding the spread of the coronavirus.

Cole-Nelson wants everyone to know that as of today’s date, Floyd Valley Healthcare has not had anyone testing positive with the COVID-19 virus.

 

 

Le Mars Community Board Of Education Calls For Special Meeting

(Le Mars) — The Le Mars Community Board of Education has scheduled another special meeting for this week. School board members will convene at noon today at the Education Service Center. School superintendent, Dr. Steve Webner will update the school board on the latest information regarding the COVID-19 coronavirus. As for action items, the board will consider possible
pay options for hourly wage employees during the coronavirus work stoppage. The Board of Education will also consider revising the school calendar for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year.  Under the recommendation of Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds, Le Mars Community School District, along with schools across the state, are closed for the next four weeks.

 

 

Transit Systems Making Changes Due To Coronavirus

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) – Transit systems in Cedar Rapids and Des Moines have taken steps to help stop the spread of the coronavirus. City of Cedar Rapids Transit buses will carry no more than 10 passengers at a time starting Wednesday in order to minimize contact. Officials encouraged people to limit
usage to essential rides, such as trips to work or to grocery stores. The Des Moines transit system has stopped fare collections and is asking riders who can safely do so to get on and off buses through the back doors. The goal is
to minimize contact between riders and system employees.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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